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Health

5 Ways to Improve Your Respiratory Health

Respiratory diseases are the third-leading cause of death worldwide. That’s why it’s crucial to take measures to improve your respiratory health and prevent further issues from arising. Respiration is the process that exchanges carbon dioxide and oxygen between your body and the environment. It is essential for life because it fuels the energy needed for movement, thinking, growth, and other bodily functions. When something interferes with this process in your body, you may experience adverse effects such as shortness of breath, wheezing, or coughing. Fortunately, there are several ways to improve your respiratory health to avoid developing these conditions or reduce their severity if they have already developed. Keep reading to find out more about how you can protect your respiratory health.

Stay at a healthy weight

A healthy weight is one that allows you to maintain a healthy body mass index. It is important to maintain a healthy weight because it reduces your risk of developing many diseases, including respiratory diseases. A healthy diet and regular exercise can help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. A healthy diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, which help to prevent weight gain by providing you with sufficient nutrients without excess calories. Regular exercise can also help you maintain a healthy weight. It increases your metabolism, which helps you burn more calories throughout the day.

Exercise regularly

Regular exercise can help improve your respiratory health and reduce your risk of developing lung infections. It is crucial to choose an exercise that is right for you, such as walking, swimming, or yoga. These activities allow you to sustain a healthy respiratory system without overworking your muscles or joints. Avoid exercising in high-risk environments, such as in a closed space without sufficient ventilation, as this may increase your risk of developing a respiratory infection.

Monitor your diet

A healthy diet is rich in vegetables and fruits, whole grains, legumes, and nuts, which are rich in fiber. A diet that is high in fiber can help reduce symptoms associated with asthma, such as shortness of breath or wheezing. It can also reduce your risk of developing other respiratory diseases, such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can also help prevent lung cancer. A diet that is low in fat can help reduce your risk of developing respiratory diseases, such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which are often associated with smoking. A diet that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids can also help prevent lung cancer.

Get enough quality sleep

Poor sleep can increase your risk of developing respiratory diseases. It can also exacerbate existing respiratory conditions. If you regularly experience sleep disorders, such as difficulty falling asleep, waking up too early, or experiencing restless sleep, it is important to seek medical attention. Poor sleep can be caused by many factors, such as anxiety, stress, a poor sleeping environment, or taking certain medications. There are several ways that you can reduce your risk of experiencing poor sleep and its consequences. They can include exercising regularly, reducing your caffeine intake, taking medications as prescribed by your doctor, and creating a sleep environment that promotes rest.

Supplement with N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)

N-acetylcysteine is an amino acid that can help reduce your risk of developing respiratory diseases. It can also help ease the symptoms of existing respiratory conditions. NAC is often prescribed to people who suffer from lung infections, such as the common cold, or cystic fibrosis. NAC supplements can be purchased in either pill or lozenge form. It can also be found in some multi-vitamin supplements. It is important that you follow the instructions on the packaging, as there are different dosages recommended depending on your health condition. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should consult your doctor before taking this supplement.

Conclusion

Respiratory diseases, such as bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma, can have a negative impact on your life. It’s crucial to take measures to improve your respiratory health to reduce your risk of developing further conditions and to ease the symptoms associated with existing conditions. It is important to follow a healthy lifestyle by eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, sleeping for at least 7 hours a night, and reducing your stress levels. You can further protect your respiratory health by staying at a healthy weight, avoiding smoking and second-hand smoke, and maintaining good hygiene.

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Medical

5 Ways an MSN Can Help Mitigate Nurse Burnout

Does the thought of putting on your medical scrubs and going to work make you want to crawl back in bed and hide under covers? Or are you struggling to maintain an upbeat attitude and enjoy things you once loved? Do you find yourself worrying excessively, or has your family noticed a change in your behavior or personality? If so, you are likely suffering from burnout. A common problem among healthcare professionals, burnout affects both new and seasoned nurses.

While it isn’t classified as a medical condition, job-related burnout creates a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion resulting from stress. It affects workers in every industry for a variety of reasons.

Among nurses, burnout is commonly a result of working long hours and not getting enough sleep. Staffing shortages, lack of social support, quick decision making and poor work-life balance contribute to burnout, as well. Throw in a global pandemic, and it should come as no surprise that many nurses have developed stress-related disorders and been on the edge of quitting their jobs throughout the last few years. Many have left nursing (or plan to do so soon) to embark on different career paths, furthering staffing shortages in hospitals and clinics throughout the United States.

If you’re struggling with feeling burnt out, don’t hang up your medical scrubs for good just yet! There are several ways to combat stress and fall in love with nursing again. Obtaining a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) opens up new opportunities and could help you find joy in your work again. Let’s take a closer look at a few ways an MSN can help mitigate nurse burnout.

  1. An MSN Opens Up New Job Opportunities

Direct patient care isn’t easy, and it can take a serious toll on your mental and emotional health. If working directly with patients is getting to you, earning an MSN could be a perfect solution. This degree opens doors to new roles outside and inside clinical settings. Your education will prepare you for leadership roles in which you can have a positive impact on employee health and patient care. You can use your knowledge and skills to mitigate burnout for other healthcare professionals.

As an MSN nurse, you will also be qualified for jobs that don’t involve direct patient care at all. You could work in clinical research, higher education or healthcare management and leadership. Breaking away from caring for patients directly allows you to continue the work you are passionate about while lowering your risk of burnout.

  1. MSN Nurses Earn More Money

Higher degrees lead to higher paychecks. If you’re feeling like you are working way too hard and dedicating too much of your life to a job that doesn’t offer adequate compensation, earning your MSN is a great way to boost your income. MSN nurses make about 44 percent more money than RNs.

You can earn even more if you decide to pursue a specialty (more on that next!). Depending on what program you choose, you can focus on specialties outside of routine clinical care, such as surgery, gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and oncology.

  1. An Advanced Degree Allows You to Work in Your Preferred Specialty

Going back to school for your MSN is a great idea if you want to dedicate your career to working in a specific specialty. Obtaining additional education broadens job opportunities, and specialization builds expertise. You may still need additional credentialing, but an MSN opens advanced practice areas, including nurse practitioner, certified nurse anesthetist, certified nurse-midwife and clinical nurse specialist. In addition to allowing you to devote your career to helping a certain type of patient, these jobs are some of the highest-paying options for nurses.

  1. An MSN Helps You Gain Access to Managerial Positions

When working toward your MSN, you’ll learn about managerial and administrative strategies in healthcare settings. Therefore, you’ll qualify for supervisory positions upon graduation (as long as you have the appropriate work experience). Moving into one of these positions could mean working fewer hours and enjoying a more consistent schedule. It also means you can play a role in developing new policies and easing burnout for your fellow nurses.

  1. Having an MSN Can Improve Your Work-Life Balance

If having a poor work-life balance is causing your burnout, an MSN could help. When you pursue a specialty area like research, writing or nurse education, your hours will be more regular and you won’t need to put in nearly as many late nights. As the healthcare industry evolves, working in these specialties could grant you more flexibility, enabling you to spend more time with your family.

Closing Thoughts

Going back to school can be a scary prospect, but the benefits are well worth it! If you are already an RN, you can earn an advanced degree in as little as one year by enrolling in a BSN to MSN program. What are you waiting for? Lace up your men’s nursing shoes, and go apply to enter an MSN program. Just taking that first step can ease some of your feelings of stress and burnout.

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Medical

Are You at Risk of a Heart Disease?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list heart disease as the number 1 killer of both men and women in America. It causes one death every 40 seconds and is responsible for more than 1 in 3 deaths each year. 

Heart disease often develops over many years and could be triggered or worsened by certain factors. These include smoking, being overweight, overeating unhealthy food, or not exercising.

This article will review the signs, symptoms, and management of heart disease so that you can better protect your health.

What Are the Types of Cardiovascular Diseases?

There are many types of cardiovascular diseases, and each can present different symptoms and risk factors. 

  • Coronary artery disease: This type of heart disease is the most popular. This happens when the arteries that supply blood to the heart are narrowed or blocked, leading to a heart attack.
  • Heart failure: This is a type of heart disease that is caused by the heart’s inability to pump sufficient blood for the body. Heart failure can result from many different conditions, including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes.
  • Arrhythmias: This type of heart disease causes problems with the rhythm of the heartbeat. Arrhythmias can be caused by a variety of conditions, including heart disease, electrolyte imbalances, and anger or stress.
  • Congenital heart defects: These are defects in the structure of the heart that are present at birth. Congenital heart defects can vary from mild to severe and can lead to a variety of problems, including heart failure and arrhythmias.

Who is at Risk of Getting Heart Disease?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and sadly, many people are at risk of developing this deadly condition. Factors that can contribute to your risk of heart disease include genetics, lifestyle choices, and health conditions. 

You may be more likely to develop heart disease if you have a family history of the condition. In addition, smoking, obesity, and high blood pressure are all lifestyle choices that can increase your risk of heart disease. And finally, certain health conditions like diabetes can also make you more susceptible to developing heart disease.

Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about your risk of heart disease. They can help you assess your risk factors and develop a plan to help keep your heart healthy.

5 Ways to Reduce Your Chances of Heart Disease

These are some ways to lower your risk of developing heart disease significantly.

  1. Eat Healthily

It is important to eat a healthy diet because it helps reduce your risk for heart disease.  Eating a heart-healthy diet is recommended to keep your heart strong and functioning correctly. 

The dies include plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats. You should also cut back on sugar-sweetened beverages, fatty meats, and dairy products. 

Eat lots of lean protein sources such as fish/shellfish/poultry/meat from animals raised on pasture food or without the use of antibiotics. Also, eat healthy fats from sources such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts. 

  1. Move Your Body

Research shows that your risk of cardiovascular issues increases if you don’t exercise. But what if you’re unsure where to start or the time and commitment aren’t there?

It’s not necessary to be an athlete or in perfect shape. Working out for at least 30 minutes a day can protect you against heart disease. 

According to doctors, it can also reduce your chances of diabetes and lessen back pain. It is never too late to start, even if you feel it could be hard on your joints and muscles. 

Physicians suggest that the slow introduction of workouts can make all the difference in preventing diseases from happening or worsening them. 

Over time, you can increase your daily or weekly workouts as your body gets used to exercising. There are many personal training templates online to help you get started.

  1. Quit Smoking

Third, you can avoid smoking or quit smoking if you currently smoke. Smoking also affects the arteries and creates blood clots which are harmful and prevent the easy flow of blood through the body.

If you already have heart disease, quitting can reduce your chances of a stroke or heart attack. There are several ways to manage the situation, which include medication and lifestyle changes. However, it is crucial you do your part and be consistent.

  1. Get Enough Rest

The lack of sleep is a major problem in the modern world. Not only does it affect your mood and cognitive abilities, but it also increases your risk for various diseases. One of the most common health problems that is associated with lack of sleep is heart disease.

A study found that people who slept less than 6 hours per night were more likely to develop heart disease than those who slept at least 8 hours per night.

The study shows that not getting enough sleep can cause serious health problems in the long term, so make sure you get enough sleep each day!

  1. Destress Regularly

There are many things you can do to reduce your risk of heart disease, and one of them is to manage stress. Stress can contribute to high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease.

You should practice various easy methods to destress regularly. You can find healthy ways to destress, whether it’s through yoga, meditation, or time with friends or family. 

Do whatever helps you calm down and unwind, even if it’s sitting daily and practicing breathing exercises. Taking some time each day to relax and de-stress can make a big difference in your overall health and well-being. 

What Are the Risk Factors For Heart Disease?

Various controllable and uncontrollable factors can significantly increase your risk of developing heart disease.

One of the most important controllable risk factors for heart disease is high blood pressure. High blood pressure puts extra strain on your heart and arteries and can damage them over time. Keeping your blood pressure under control is one of the best things you can do to reduce your risk of heart disease.

Other controllable risk factors for heart disease include high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, and being overweight. These factors can all damage your heart and arteries in different ways. Managing these factors can help to reduce your risk of heart disease.

There are also several non-controllable risk factors for heart disease. These include age, family history, and gender. You cannot change these factors, but you can be aware of them and take steps to reduce your risk.

If you have any of the controllable risk factors for heart disease, it is important to take steps to manage them. Your doctor will advise you on some lifestyle changes, which include eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. 

If you have any of the non-controllable risk factors, you should talk to your doctor for your best options in preventing or managing the situation.

Early Signs of Heart Disease

When it comes to heart disease, many people think that it is something that only affects older adults. However, the truth is that anyone can be at risk of developing this condition. 

While there are some risk factors that you cannot change, such as family history, there are others that you can control. By being aware of the early signs of heart disease, you can take steps to reduce your risk and improve your overall health.

  1. Chest Pain or Discomfort

Chest pain or discomfort is one of the most common early signs of heart disease. This can feel like a heaviness or tightness in the chest and may be aggravated by physical activity. 

If you experience any type of chest pain, it is important to see a doctor right away so that they can rule out other potential causes.

  1. Shortness of Breath

Another early sign of heart disease is shortness of breath. This may occur even when you are at rest or doing activities that are not normally strenuous. If you find yourself becoming winded more easily than usual, it is important to see a doctor to determine the cause.

  1. Fatigue

Fatigue is another common symptom of early heart disease. Maybe you are constantly feeling tired and do not have the energy for your usual activities. 

If you find yourself feeling exhausted more often than usual, it could be a sign that your heart isn’t pumping as efficiently as it should be.  If this is the case, it is important to see a doctor to find out why. 

Conclusion

Heart disease is a serious health condition that should not be taken lightly. If you are at risk of heart disease, it is important to take steps to lower your risk and keep your heart healthy. 

There are many things you can do to reduce your risk, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and managing stress. If you are at risk of heart disease, talk to your doctor about ways you can reduce your risk and protect your heart.

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Info

What’s Happening In The Linux Kernel

After so long, the center engineers of Linux continue to develop. The new renditions will be quicker and more steady.

Click on this wejii.com

 

Linux runs essentially everything: each of the 500 of the world’s 500 quickest supercomputers; Most of the public cloud, even on Microsoft Azure; and 74 percent of cell phones. To be sure, on account of Android, Linux is the most well-known end-client working framework, dominating Windows by 4% (39% versus 35%).

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Where Does Linux Go Straightaway?

 Subsequent to covering Linux for very nearly 29 years of its set of experiences and knowing anybody in the Linux improvement circle, up to and including Linus Torvalds, I assume I understand.

 

Ongoing Linux Kernel Improvements

The greatest ongoing improvement – and nothing close – Linux will presently turn into the stage for Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). While Linux, because of OpenVPN, has for some time been a critical VPN player, the expansion of WireGuard, a progressive way to deal with VPNs, makes a huge difference.

 

Once more Torvald super likes WireGuard: “Could I at any point express my affection for itself and trust it blends soon?” He has composed. What Linus needs, Linus gets. WireGuard was converged into the Linux 5.6 part in March 2020.

 

Obviously Linux Work Areas.

“Rust is totally memory safe.”

Ryan Levick Microsoft Principal Cloud Developer Advocate

 

The Linux 5.6 bit gloats a few other significant enhancements too. In the first place, for those actually running 32-bit frameworks,

What will happen is the incentive for a time in 32-digit based Unix-based working frameworks, for example, prior adaptations of Linux and macOS, will be supplanted by 32-bit numbers. Then, at that point, they would begin counting the time in reverse with negative numbers. Also, you thought the Y2K bug was alarming!

Everything began in light of the fact that Unix, the dad of Linux, began date of time in seconds from the age: of 00:00:00 GMT on January 1, 1970. The rub was since Unix started as a 32-cycle working framework, it kept time as a solitary marked 32-bit number. Those are a ton of seconds, yet all the same, it’s sufficiently not. The fix likewise retrofits 32-digit Linux to utilize 64-cycle numbers. Obviously, this main defer the issue until 5:30:08 GMT Sunday, December 4, 29,227,702,659. I’m alright with that.

Android and Linux sync

Each and every individual who has focused on the working framework realizes that Android is a portable explicit Linux dispersion. What may not be known is that, for a long time, Android was a Linux fork. Indeed, even now, 10 years some other time when Android and center Linux designers began working and playing pleasantly with one another once more, they are not in total agreement. He’s evolving.

As Linux bit designer and creator Jonathan Corbett said in his yearly Linux piece report, “The most recent stable portions are headed to be essential for the Android nonexclusive framework picture, then, at that point, they will follow stable updates. Exceptionally near the ongoing circumstance.”

It probably won’t seem like no joking matter for you, yet it is.

Why here? 

Today, it goes through three particular, tedious stages, before Linux winds up on that totally new Android telephone in your grasp. In the first place, Google takes a Long Term Support (LTS) piece and adds Android-explicit code to make Android a nonexclusive part. Then, Google sends that Android nonexclusive part to a framework on-a-chip (SoC) maker, like Qualcomm. The OEM then, at that point, improves the portion for a particular SoC and chipset. At last, the SoC piece goes to the cell phone creator. The producer, thus, adds restrictive drivers, cameras, and Wi-Fi/cell modems to its Home Brew, show. This gadget part is the one that is on your telephone.

En route, each telephone gets in a real sense a huge number of lines of piece code that isn’t essential for standard circulation. The majority of these gadgets are drivers. Each cell phone or Android tablet accompanies its own blend of drivers. To this end a genuine general Android cell phone dissemination, for example, the/e/working framework, is so troublesome. Result? That fast new telephone in your pocket has a 2-year-old Linux piece. It is a direct result of these old parts that the Linux LTS piece currently accompanies six years of help.

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What is the main feature of Accounting courses

Accounting makes different people imagine different things; some may relate the term to cash; for others, keeping a daily count of expenses is the only way they resonate accounting with. So what is accounting, and what does it incorporate. But, first, let’s learn a bit about public finance.

What Is Accounting?

The truth is different scholars and various academic institutions define accounting differently. However, if you create a daily understanding and research it for a few years, you have your definition.

Here is what Smith and Ashburne have to say. According to them, accounting records and scientifically classifies a business transaction. The financial character makes justifiable summaries and examines and explains the transactions and events. Then it expresses the results to the decision maker or the one who makes a judgment.

The Committee on Terminology is quite direct with its definition. They call accounting an art of recording, classifying, and summing up money, transaction, and event in a significant way that highlights their financial character and the result thereof.

This accounting definition draws the nature, scope, and substance of accounting from transaction recording to sending the results to the concerned parties.

Aspects Of Accounting

Today, everybody uses accounting. It is the language of finance. Therefore, it is beneficial to know the term in detail. In addition, it would help you recognize its aspects to understand the subject clearly.

  • Economic Events-it talks about the situation when a company has to make numerous transactions. For example, purchasing new machinery or vehicles or installing machinery on-site is an example of an economic event.
  • Identification, Measurement, Recording, and Communication-An organization must outline the accounting system so that individuals must identify, measure, record, and communicate the accurate data or information to the right person at the right time.
  • Organization-In refers to the scale of activities and standards of a business operation.
  • Interested Users of Information-It is the correspondence of significant financial data to the customers, based on which they will make the correct decision.

Components of Accounting

 

Assets

An enterprise possesses various items; all that have economic value are termed as assets. From a different perspective, all things that generate income or can be transformed into cash are called assets.


  • Liabilities-

Anything of economic value that a company is obligated to pay to another establishment or individual is a liability for a company. Usually, liabilities arise out of previous transactions.


  • Owner’s Equity- 

It is one of the three most crucial parts of a business. In simple terms, it depicts the proportion of the total company’s assets that an owner or shareholders can claim from a business.

The main object of Accounting is to ascertain the results of the financial transactions of a business concern.

Objectives Of Accounting

The primary objective of a company is to ascertain the results of a financial transaction of a business. The other goals include:

Identifying and recording transactions

Accounting tries to identify the financial transactions and record them in its books to keep details of every transaction in a journal, then permanently saving them in a ledger. It reduces the stress of keeping everything in mind.

Ascertainment of results

Every business concern wants to know the results of its operation after a specific period. For example, a company can ascertain the profit or loss results from an income statement. The revenue ledger account balances help to perform the job.

Non-trading companies can also know their surplus or deficit; they must prepare their income and expenditure statements.

Ascertainment of financial affairs

Accounting aims to ascertain the debts and liabilities, properties and assets – the total financial affair of a company on a specific date. The best way out is through a balance sheet. The statement contains the assets and liabilities on a particular date.

Keeping accounts of cash

Cashbook is one of the leading books of accounts that record the cash receipts and payments, cash in hand, cash at the bank and daily cash. Maintaining it scientifically and accurately reduces money misappropriation, forgery or fraudulent activities.

Control over assets and liabilities

a business can run successfully if it acquires new assets like land, building, machinery, etc. similarly, it faces various debts and liabilities like payable accounts, notes, loans, bank overdrafts, etc. Keeping accounts properly helps ascertain the actual position of both sides of the balance sheet, and controlling it maintains the balance.

Controlling money defalcation and cost

The main objects of accounting are the prevention of money defalcation through fraud and forgery and controlling the cost of concern. For more details read My Assignment Help Reviews

Prevention of money defalcation and cost control becomes easier if accounts are kept scientifically.

Proidving economic data

Accounting also aims to provide economic information to parties concerned by providing them with financial statements and reports in time. For more writing click here

Signing off,

Accounting is a phenomenon yet a part of our everyday world. The above discussion does not cover everything about accounting; it is just a bird’s eye view to give you the fundamental accounting concept. I hope to clear any misconceptions about accounting. The next time anyone tries to teach you anything about accounting, you will not be misled or can take Financial Accounting Assignment Help.

Author Bio:

Denny Martin is a professional academic writer at one of the most reliable websites, MyAssignmenthelp.com. He has years of expertise in creating highly engaging essays, assignments, research papers, thesis, case studies and other academic papers for students.

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All you need to know about 5G

In media correspondences, 5G broadband is the fifth-age development standard for cell networks that remote associations began to convey generally speaking in 2019, and is the organized substitution to the 4G association that gives accessibility to most recent cellphones. As demonstrated by the GSM Association, 5G associations are projected to have over 1.7 billion allies generally by 2025.

Like their predecessors, 5G associations are cell associations, in which the assistance district is divided into additional unassuming geographic locales called cells. All 5G far off devices in the cell are related with the Internet and telephone networks by radio waves through a close by recieving wire in the cell. The new association has higher download speeds, over the long haul up to 10 gigabits each second (Gbit/s). As well as being 5G faster than existing associations, 5G has higher information move limit and can thus connect more different contraptions while chipping away at the idea of Internet organizations in obstructed locales. Due to the extended exchange speed, it is ordinary that the association will be logically used as should be expected Internet expert centers (ISPs) for workstations and PCs, matching existing ISPs like satellite Internet, and in the Internet. It will moreover make possible new uses of things (IoT) and machine-to-machine districts. Cellphones with 4G limit alone can’t use the new association, which requires a 5G-skilled distant contraption. Follow techkorr to investigate more subjects.

Insight

5G associations are cell associations, in which the assistance locale is parceled into additional humble geographic districts called cells. All 5G distant devices in a cell examine by radio waves with a cell base station through fixed recieving wires, on not entirely set in stone by the base station. Base stations, called GnoDBs, are trading centers in telephone associations and related with switches for Internet access by high-move speed optical fiber or remote backhaul affiliations. Like other cell associations, a mobile phone moving beginning with one cell then onto the following is normally consigned to the continuous cell. 5G can maintain a million devices for each square kilometer, while 4G support simply a tenth of that breaking point.

Numerous association managers use millimeter waves, called FR2, in 5G phrasing, for added limit and higher throughput. Millimeter waves have a more restricted range than microwaves, so cells are limited to a more unobtrusive size. Millimeter waves in like manner experience more trouble going through building dividers. Millimeter-wave recieving wires are more unassuming than the greater recieving wires used in past cell associations. Some are two or three centimeters in length. Likewise, figure out how quick is 600 Kbps speed.

Application areas

ITU-R has described three head application areas for the superior capacities of 5G. They are Enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB), Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC), and Massive Machine Type Communications (mMTC). Just eMBB is conveyed in 2020; URLLC and mMTC are a seriously drawn-out period of time away in many spots.

Worked on flexible broadband (eMBB) uses 5G as a movement from 4G LTE compact broadband organizations with speedier affiliations, higher throughput and more conspicuous breaking point. This will help high-traffic locales, for instance, fields, metropolitan networks and show scenes.

Very reliable low-dormancy correspondence (URLLC) implies including networks for pivotal applications that require predictable and generous data exchange. Short-package data transmission is used to meet both the steadfastness and inaction necessities of distant correspondence associations.

Gigantic Machine-Type Communications (MMTC) will be used to interact with a colossal number of contraptions. 5G development will relate a part of the 50 billion related IoT contraptions. Most will use more reasonable Wi-Fi. Drones, sending through 4G or 5G, will help fiasco recovery attempts, giving consistent data to emergency responders. Most vehicles will have a 4G or 5G cell relationship for various organizations. Autonomous vehicles don’t require 5G, as they ought to have the choice to work where they don’t have an association affiliation. In any case, most free vehicles also feature teleoperation for mission achievement, and benefit essentially from 5G development.

Pace

5G rates will go from ~50 Mbit/s to 1,000 Mbit/s (1 Gbit/s). The fastest 5G rates will be in the mmWave band and can show up at up to 4 Gbit/s with carrier mixture and MIMO.

Sub-6 GHz 5G (mid-band 5G), by a landslide the most notable, will routinely convey some place in the scope of 100 and 1,400 Mbit/s, yet will have much higher reach than mmWave, especially outside. C-band (N77/N78) will be sent by various US overseers in 2022. The C-band was needed to be sent by Verizon and AT&T around the start of January 2022, yet was conceded as a result of wellbeing concerns raised by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The low-band range gives the best reach, provoking a more vital incorporation locale for a given site, yet its speed is lower than that of the mid-and high-gatherings.

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Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center

In Cooperstown, New York, in 1956 a relatively unknown name in the medical world perfected a process that, has since, saved the lives of thousands. It was Dr. E. Donnall Thomas that, in that year, successfully transplanted bone marrow from one healthy twin to the other suffering from leukemia. 

The medical procedure pioneered by Dr. E. Donnall Thomas is now used routinely by doctors across the world to treat patients with a variety of blood disorders, not just leukemia. Effective bone marrow transplants are also undertaken for sufferers of anemia and numerous other inherited disorders of the immune system.

Prior to the innovation of bone marrow transplantation, patients could not be treated via chemotherapy. This was because the doses of chemotherapy and radiation required to kill the cancerous cells, also killed off the healthy cells in the bone marrow. However, with bone marrow transplants, the healthy cells that are destroyed by the high levels of chemotherapy and radiation can be replaced by those from a suitable donor.

The science of bone marrow transplantation has not ceased in its evolution since 1956. Today it is a very specialist area of modern medicine with dedicated bone marrow transplant centers throughout the world. One of the most advanced of these is theBone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center at Samitivej Hospital.

This dedicated center is now one of the world’s leading centers for bone marrow transplants. It is at the cutting edge of new and progressive techniques and procedural evolution that has resulted in an enviable level of success in treating bone marrow and immune system disorders. 

Globally, the patient survival rate exceeding one year following a bone marrow transplant is currently 68%. For the same period, The Canadian Cancer Society reports that up to 70% of patients will survive past one year. The figure for Europe is 88%, whilst the Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center at Samitivej Hospital has a survival rate of 96%. 

Couple these impressive statistics with a mortality rate in infants with thalassemia, following Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant treatment, at 0%, it is easy to see that Samitivej Hospital’s Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center has become a world leader. 

The center, sited at Samitivej’s Srinakarin Hospital and began treating patients in September of 2004. Staffed by highly trained medical professionals using state of the art equipment, the center is now a world leader. The facility meets and surpasses international standards and boasts a Positive Pressure Room designed to combat and prevent infection. This includes those receiving high levels of chemotherapy. These rooms are all fitted with HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filtration.

Types of Bone Marrow Donor

Allogeneic Transplant is a procedure where a patient is given healthy stem cells from a suitable donor. This is done to replace the patient’s own cells which have been damaged following treatment of high level chemotherapy or radiation.

Healthy stem cells are extracted from the healthy blood or bone marrow from a related donor which is not an identical twin, commonly a brother or sister. Cells can also be harvested from a non-related donor that has similar genetics to the patient.

Haploidentical-related donors are usually the mother or father of the patients. These donors will require a minimum of a 50% genetic match to the stem cell recipient. Donor selection is done with HLA (human platelet alloantigens) matching. Additionally, unrelated donor matching can be done with registered donors from worldwide donor lists.

Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation

Initially, a full assessment of the patient’s disease is undertaken. Then HLA (human leukocyte antigens) screening is done for the patient and the donor. Also, prior to any transplantation therapy the patient and donor will undergo a comprehensive health study. This will include any historical kidney or liver disease, other chronic conditions, any infections and medications currently prescribed.

Transplantation can then begin. Firstly, conditioning chemotherapy is administered. This is done to eradicate or reduce the bone marrow and lymph nodes where the cancerous cells develop. Then harvesting of stem cells from the donor takes place and can be transferred to the patient.

Finally, for a period of between 2 and 4 weeks, the patient will be monitored to assess the efficacy of the new cells functional performance. The 3 steps of the transplant procedure would typically take a month. Transplantation will be followed by post-procedural checks every 1 or 2 weeks for around 3 months. Following that, less frequent monitoring will be required for up to 2 years.

Prevention and Treatment of GvHD

GvHD, or, graft versus host disease is a very real risk following any form of transplantation, with the prevention and treatment being referred to as Photopheresis. This treatment for GvHD is an entirely non-invasive and painless procedure specifically designed to stimulate the immune system which aids in fighting disease. Samitivej Hospital’s Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center has successfully used this treatment on patients as young as 2 years old.

The procedure entails blood being drawn from the patient. The white blood cells are separated from the red cells and are then mixed with the medication, they are then exposed to ultra violet light. Each photopheresis procedure takes 3 to 4 hours and each patient will undergo several of these procedures for up to 12 weeks. The exact number of procedures will be determined by the nature of the patient’s disease. 

It is also worth noting that the Samitivej Hospital Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center is the only dedicated facility in the Asia Pacific Region with specialist photopheresis equipment that can treat children as young as 2 years and with a body weight as little as 10 kilos. 

There are some side effects associated with photopheresis. These are likely to include tingling or numbness in the fingers and lips. Cramps and a feeling of being lightheaded are also common. Some more serious side effects are a fever and a drop in blood pressure. Medication can be prescribed to counter the negative side effects of the treatment.

Following photopheresis treatment there are some simple lifestyle adjustments patients can make as precautionary steps in order to minimize possible side effects. Avoiding direct sunlight is advisable. Patients should also use sunscreen with at least an SPA factor of 50 and wear quality UVA sunglasses.

Bone marrow and stem cell transplantation continues to evolve through science and technology. The Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Center at Samitivej Hospital will continue to keep itself at the forefront of treatment and procedural advances. With its unrivaled levels of successful treatment in this area of medicine, there is no better place for bone marrow and stem cell transplant treatment.

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skin care

Differences In A Tantric Massage

You may have heard the word tantric thrown around a few times in regard to sex and assumed that a tantric massage was the same thing. However, a tantric massage is a lot more than a regular massage and can be a totally new experience worth trying. If you’re looking for an exciting and sensual massage, you could look at booking a tantric massage in London. So, if you’re interested to learn more about the differences between a tantric massage and other forms of massage therapy, keep reading and delve into the tantric world. 

What Is A Tantric Massage? 

The word tantra essentially means “balance” and this is reflected in massage therapy. The aim is to balance your energy and allow you to feel liberated and at peace with your body. The massage is performed in the nude, features aspects of meditation and breathwork, and isn’t purely sexual. Your full body will be massaged, including your genitalia, and though some people can experience orgasms during the session, this isn’t the end goal. The masseur will use aromatic oils to easily glide over your body and focus on certain areas to create waves of energy within you. Tantric massaging allows you to release any tension and blockages within your body and can help you address emotional barriers. 

Is It The Same As An Erotic Massage? 

People may confuse the two massages and assume that they’re the same thing. The main difference is that an erotic massage is purely about bringing the other person to orgasm and is focused on the sexual aspect of massage. A tantric massage incorporates mindfulness and meditation to allow your body and mind to connect. One similarity between them is the person receiving the massage does not need to reciprocate the pleasure to the masseur. Both allow you to feel a climactic release without needing to provide the same return. 

How Can It Benefit Me? 

There are many suggested benefits from receiving a tantric massage. Such as improving your health, reducing stress, and even treating sexual dysfunctions. Some people have found that it can strengthen their relationship with their partner and help heal emotional pain. A tantric massage can awaken your sexual energy and if an orgasm is achieved during the session, it can be powerful and make you more connected to your inner self. This form of massage therapy can help you achieve a higher state of relaxation compared to others too. 

Can I Learn? 

If you’d like to experience a tantric massage with your partner, you can learn. However, it will take practice as with any massage, there are certain ways the body is touched to create the right sensations. There are plenty of step-by-step guides available, and it may take a couple of attempts to get it right. However, engaging in this practice together can help you become more emotionally connected and become more open to experiencing pleasure in new ways. 

A tantric massage is about creating a connection with your body and soul, not sexual release. Not only can you feel enlightened and empowered after your session, but the results can also feed into other areas of your life too. Although you may climax during the session, this isn’t the masseur’s intention. Their goal is to provide you with a relaxing, spiritual experience.

Categories
skin care

5 Best Essential Oils For Dry Skin & Other Skin Issues In Winter

While many people love winter for the love of layering stylish clothes, sipping on tasty warm beverages, and cuddling in a warm blanket while watching a movie. However, one thing that’s not good about winter is that it makes your skin dry. The chilly season is quite harsh on your skin and makes it very dry and damaged. 

Fortunately, essential oils are available to help us keep our skin nourished and well moisturized. There are enough moisturizing creams available in the market. But most of them are full of chemicals. However, essential oils contain pure extracts from plants. Therefore, these are a better way to keep your skin soft, supple, and hydrated. 

Reasons for dry and itchy skin in winter

But before knowing which essential oils are good for your skin, let’s understand why we have dry skin in winter. Here are some reasons why our skin feels dry and itchy in winter:

  1. Cold Air

Well, dry, cold air has less moisture than warm air. Therefore, cold air can be intensely drying for the skin. For keeping winter air from drying out the skin, you need to apply moisturizer daily. Also, include essential oils in the morning and night routine to lock water in your skin layer. So, you got to apply these winter essentials soon after washing your face in winter. Also, make sure to apply them when your skin is still a little damp. 

  1. Harsh winds

The strong winter winds can eliminate natural lipids from your skin. These natural oils in the skin act as a skin barrier to keep your skin from drying out. So, it is best to cover up your skin with a scarf to prevent harsh winds. Also, apply an essential oil, moisturizer, and sunscreen before stepping out of your door. And, forget to wear sunglasses to protect the skin around your eyes. 

  1. Heat in your home

The heat in your home, especially due to electronic devices, like heaters, can be drying for the skin. For resolving this problem, you can use a humidifier to add moisture content back into the air. If possible, install a whole-house humidifier or just in your bedroom to let it moist the air while you sleep. 

  1. Fireplace or bonfire

It can be tempting to sit next to a fireplace or bonfire in the harsh winter season. But the heat from the fire can toast your soft skin. And, more dead skin builds up in dry heat. For preventing dry skin in winter due to fireplace heat, it’s best to stay away from the fire as much as possible. Or just limit your time around a fireplace or campfire. 

  1. Hot showers and baths

Hot shows and baths always feel great when you have been out in the cold in dry air all day. For preventing skin from getting dry, you can use lukewarm water instead of hot water. And, also don’t take a long shower. Just aim to spend not more than 10 minutes in the shower. 

If you take a bath, it’s best to add a few drops of lavender oil or almond oil to the water to soothe your skin.  Bathing products can make a huge difference. Also, don’t cleanse with products that may dry your skin, like detergent soaps or alkaline soaps. 

After bathing, it’s important to use moisturizer within just a minute or so after getting out of a bath or shower. It is because damp skin can easily trap water while locking in moisture. 

  1. Hot drinks

On a cold winter day, everyone loves to sip a hot coffee, chocolate, or even a hot toddy. However, chocolate and coffee contain caffeine. And, caffeine may dry out your skin from within. And, if you are having hot toddy, you need to know that alcohol is a diuretic. It even includes a dehydrating effect on the body as well. 

Therefore, it’s significant to add moisture to the skin from within and outside. It is essential to drink so much water and stay your body hydrated. For every cup of caffeine or wine glasses, make sure to have at least one or two glasses of water. Even better, you need to replace hot chocolate or coffee with chamomile tea or any other herbal tea that doesn’t contain any amount of caffeine.  

  1. Winter clothing

The woolen clothing that you wear to be cozy can irritate your skin while leaving you itchy. That’s why you need to choose clothes containing soft fabrics, such as silk or cotton. This way your skin won’t rub against the harsh fabric. If you have very sensitive skin, use unscented, mild, hypoallergenic laundry detergents, etc. Also, avoid fabric softener while washing your linens and clothes. 

  1. Sun

Many people know that the sun is damaging to their skin in the summer while it’s strongest. But during the winter sun, it’s also very damaging. Even if you cannot feel the sun’s heat, the UV rays of the sun are still present. So, you are again at risk of sun damage. So, you must never leave your house without applying sunscreen. Always apply sunscreen when you’re going outside in the daytime. Also, when the temperatures are below or near freezing temperatures. You must use sunscreen on exposed areas, particularly your lips. Make sure the sunscreen is SPF 30 or above. Even when it’s windy and cold, you still sweat. Therefore, you need to reapply sunscreen. 

Best essential oils for skin problems in winter 

Here are the best essential oils for your skin:

  1. Frankincense essential oil

This particular essential oil is known for its woodsy, calming aroma. It brings the same soothing and calming properties to dry and irritated skin. You may even use it on your face, as it’s very gentle and calming. It not only has the potential to minimize fine lines and scars. But also supports the regeneration of skin cells. This makes it a great source for reducing flaky skin. It even decreases inflammation while improving your skin tone. 

  1. Rose essential oil

Rose essential oil has an intoxicating aroma. And, according to research, it also includes therapeutic antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds that promote healing. Meanwhile, it reduces inflammation. According to researchers, this essential oil also inhibits water loss in the skin while improving skin tone and texture. This makes it ideal for dry and aging skin. It adds bounce and elasticity to the skin. 

  1. Helichrysum essential oil

Out of all the essential oils for dry skin, helichrysum essential oil is our all-time favorite. Why? Well, it not only aids flaky and dry skin, but also increases skin hydration. Moreover, it is great for pigment- and scar-reducing properties as well. Therefore, it is ideal for brightening up the dull skin that has become weathered from cold and windy weather. Meanwhile, it improves the skin damaged from city pollution and stress. Helichrysum even has potent anti-inflammatory properties and is also helpful to prevent UV-induced skin damage. 

4.Geranium essential oil

If cold air has taken a toll on your skin and caused inflammation and redness along with dryness, it’s time to use geranium oil. This essential oil has calming properties, so it’s good for skin inflammation and irritation very quickly. Moreover, it includes moisturizing properties. It’s also great for reducing acne breakouts, combating UV damage, regulating oil production, balancing our skin, and improving skin elasticity. Even women with PCOD issues can use this oil for treating acne breakouts. This oil even boosts blood circulation if you are seeking a natural glow. Moreover, it helps in decreasing sun damage. 

5.Lavender essential oil

Another multitasking essential oil is lavender. It also has calming and soothing properties. So, you can use it to treat bug bites and burns, soothe dry and chapped skin, and balance your mood. When applied to dry and chapped skin on the arms and hands, your skin feels soft and supple. Lavender even promotes skin cell regeneration. So, you need to add this to your skincare routine to feel very smooth. 

Conclusion

When you add essential oils into your skincare routine, you can easily combat skin dryness and inflammation. It even improves your skin tone, pigmentation, and promotes skin cell regeneration. So, choose any of these mentioned essential oils and enhance skin moisture. 

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Info

A few words about us

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Info

Jamie LaMantia

Jamie LaMantia

Jamie LaMantia has a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Special Education from Northern Illinois University. 

She joined the University of Wisconsin (UW) School of Medicine and Public Health and the UW Health Innovation Program in 2011 as a Research Specialist working with Dr. Johnson. She helped develop MyHEART, and is now the Research Coordinator of the program. She is specifically interested in developing and promoting health education to help individuals improve their health conditions and quality of life.

When not working, Jamie enjoys creating art, working out, long walks/hikes, music, dancing, swimming, camping, spending time with children and animals, and especially curling up with a good book, a cup of tea, and her beloved black cat.

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Info

Chronic Conditions

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Addressing Incontinence in Older Women

To reduce or prevent incontinence in older women, we have designed and tested a workshop led by trained leaders to increase skills to control incontinence symptoms through lifestyle changes. “Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder” has been shown to improve continence, quality of life, and self-efficacy. The program was tested in a randomized controlled trial and is now being adapted for digital delivery.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

Read more…

Reducing Disparities in Healthcare

To reduce disparities in healthcare quality, we are partnering with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality and the Collaborative Center for Health Equity to measure and publicly report on disparities in the quality of healthcare in Wisconsin.

In 2019, we will release a statewide report documenting disparities in the quality of care for health systems across Wisconsin by race, ethnicity, and payer.

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

Bringing Patients’ Voices to American Healthcare

Patient experience is an aspect of health and health care that has received increasing attention in the U.S.  For patients and caregivers facing a new diagnosis, or needing to make a health-related decision, other people’s experiences of the same diagnosis, treatments, and impact on the life course have always been valued. With the advent of web-based health information, the influence of patient experience has grown even more rapidly.

Recognizing this gap, researchers at four universities—including UW-Madison—and the Veterans Administration formed a collaboration called the Health Experiences Research Network (HERN) in order to bring an internationally-vetted method of rigorously collecting diverse health experiences to the U.S.

In 2016, they launched www.HealthExperiencesUSA.org with an inaugural module on diverse young adults’ experiences with depression, a disease that can have significant consequences for future social, occupational, and health outcomes.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

Helping Young Adults Manage High Blood Pressure

Approximately 1 in 15 young adults in the United States have high blood pressure, but young adults have the lowest rates of blood pressure control (achieving a blood pressure <140>

To address these problems, the MyHEART program was developed with young adults and healthcare team members to address a broad range of topics. MyHEART has multiple components, including young adult education and research programs across multiple healthcare systems. 

Read more…

Preventing Blindness with UW Teleophthalmology

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in Wisconsin, where there are currently over 135,000 adults with diabetes. Early screening and treatment can prevent 90% of blindness, but only half of adults with diabetes get their recommended yearly eye screening.

In response, Dr. Yao Liu created the UW Teleophthalmology Program that enables patients in rural locations to get screened by their primary care providers during regular clinic visits without having to make a second trip or appointment. The images are then sent to UW-Madison, where eye specialists read the images and send reports back to primary care for local follow-up as needed. 

Read more…

Pages


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Privacy policy

We respect the privacy of our users. This privacy statement is designed to help you understand what information we gather and what we do with the information. It applies solely to information collected by this website. 

Information We Collect

The information we collect generally falls into two categories:

  1. information voluntarily supplied by visitors to our web sites through optional registration;
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To make use of certain features of our website (such as downloading toolkits), visitors need to register and provide certain information as part of the registration process. We may ask, for example, for your name and location, the name of your company/organization, your e-mail address, your degree(s) and specialty, and why you are interested in the toolkit for which you are registering. Unless you choose to provide this information at registration, we do not collect personally identifying information.

Google Analytics

To help make our web sites more responsive to the needs and interests of our visitors and analyze how users use the site, we use Google Analytics to keep track of the pages visited. We use this data to track overall visitor traffic patterns. We do not make any attempt to identify the people visiting our website through Google Analytics. When we are collecting personally identifiable information on the website, we are up front about what is being collected.

The Google Analytics tool uses “cookies,” which are text files placed on your computer, to collect standard Internet log information and visitor behavior information in an anonymous form. The information generated by the cookie about your use of the website is transmitted to Google. This information is then used to evaluate visitors’ use of the website and to compile statistical reports on website activity for the Health Innovation Program. 

To opt out of all Google Analytics tracking software, see here.

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Our web servers also automatically collect some information when you request pages from our web servers, which helps diagnose problems with our web servers. Cookies may also be used to help speed up your future activities or improve your user experience by remembering information that you have already provided to us. We do not use cookies to retrieve information from your computer that was not voluntarily provided by you. The use of cookies is an industry standard.

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Some sections of our website may include videos embedded from YouTube. We use the privacy-enhanced mode to embed videos. This may set cookies on your computer once you click on the YouTube video player, but YouTube will not store personally-identifiable cookie information.

Disabling Cookies on Web Browsers

To disable cookies across all websites in your browser, use the directions linked below for your particular browser.

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We take children’s privacy seriously. We do not knowingly collect personal information from children under the age of 13 through our website. If you are a child, please do not submit any personal information through our website without the express consent and participation of a parent or guardian.

How We Use the Information We Collect

The information you supply will help us to tailor our web sites to the needs and interests of our visitors and conduct internal marketing analyses. We will not sell or rent this information to anyone. The data is stored within web servers at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. If you are a resident of the European Union, please note that since we are located in the United States, the information you provide will be processed in a country outside the European Economic Area (EEA), which may not provide the same level of data protection. However, we take measures to protect your personal information as outlined in the Security section below.

We may share aggregated, de-identified registration data with our partners and funders.

If you contact us, we may use your personal information to respond to your requests.

If you have not opted out of emails, we may contact you via email in the future to tell you about new tools, updated materials, or regarding your use of the materials you have registered to view.

We will never (and will not allow any third party to) use the statistical analytics tool to track or to collect any Personally Identifiable Information (PII) of visitors to our site. We will not associate any data gathered from this site with any Personally Identifiable Information from any source, unless you explicitly submit that information via a registration or other fill-in form on our website.

We may disclose your personal information if permitted by law or required to do so by law or where we believe such action is necessary in order to protect or defend our interests or the interests of users of the website. 

How Long We Store the Information We Collect

We may keep the information that we collect for an unlimited period of time so that we can track the overall number of visitors on the website over time and review historical trends.

Opting Out or Changing Your Information

If you wish to opt-out of Google Analytics, turn on your web browser’s “Do-not-track” option or disable javascript. You can learn more about how Google Analytics works here: https://www.google.com/analytics/index.html. You can also set your browser not to accept cookies, but if you do, you may not be able to take advantage of certain personalized features enjoyed by other visitors to our web sites. For more information about “Do-Not-Track” and other tracking technologies, please visit https://allaboutdnt.com and www.allaboutcookies.org.

You may request that we update your information, remove your information, provide you with a copy of the information we have about you, or correct any inaccuracies in such personal data by emailing . You can also change your own information by clicking on your username on the website after you have logged in.

In the event of change in control, transfer of substantial assets, reorganization, or liquidation, we may transfer or assign to third parties information concerning your relationship with us, including without limitation, personally identifiable information that you provide and other information concerning your relationship with us.

Security

We take reasonable technical and organizational precautions to protect your information. We have put in place appropriate physical and electronic procedures to safeguard the information we collect; however, due to the open communication nature of the Internet, we cannot guarantee that communications between you and us, or information stored on servers, will be free from unauthorized access by third parties.

The site you are visiting is one of the Health Innovation Program’s general audience sites. This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the content or privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of any other site that collects personally identifiable information. 

A final note: The Web is an evolving medium. We may need to change our privacy policy from time to time. By continuing to use the services after we post such changes, you accept the terms of this policy, as modified. When the privacy policy changes, we will inform users via the email address they provided.

How to Contact Us

If you have any questions or concerns about the MyHEART online policy for this site or its implementation you may contact us at the following address:

MyHEART 

H4/512 Clinical Science Center, MC 3248

600 Highland Ave.

Madison, WI 53792

E-mail:

This privacy statement was last updated on May 24, 2018.

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What do the blood pressure numbers mean?

Every blood pressure has two numbers and can be written in two ways:

118/72 mmHg  118/72 mmHg

The top number (118) is the systolic blood pressure. The systolic blood pressure is the force in the blood vessels when the heart squeezes during a heartbeat.

The bottom number (72) is the diastolic blood pressure. The diastolic blood pressure is the force in the blood vessels when the heart is resting between heart beats. The symbol “mmHg” is read as “millimeters of mercury.”

 

There are 4 blood pressure categories for all adults (anyone at least 18 years of age).

Even if you do not have high blood pressure, you should have your blood pressure checked at least once a year. Talk to your healthcare provider about what you can do to lower your blood pressure.

Normal blood pressureNormal Blood Pressure

Your top number (systolic) is less than 120 mmHg and your bottom number (diastolic) is less than 80 mmHg.

Pre-HypertensionPre-Hypertension

Your top number (systolic) is between 120 and 139 mmHg or your bottom number (diastolic) is between 80 and 89 mmHg.

Your blood pressure is in the “borderline” range. You are at high risk of developing high blood pressure (also called “hypertension”).

Stage 1 HypertensionStage 1 High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

Your top number (systolic) is between 140 and 159 mmHg or your bottom number (diastolic) is between 90 and 99 mmHg.

You have high blood pressure (hypertension). Sometimes this level of high blood is called “mildly high.” You are still at risk of having damage to your body from the high pressure.

Stage 2 HypertensionStage 2 High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

Your top number (systolic) is at least 160 mmHg or higher or your bottom number (diastolic) is at least 100 mmHg or higher.

You have high blood pressure (hypertension). You are at risk of having damage to your body from the high pressure against your blood vessels – including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, or kidney disease.

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Exercise for a Healthy Heart

Exercise is the BEST medicine!

ExerciseWhen done regularly, exercise can:

  • lower your stress
  • lower your blood pressure
  • relax your blood vessels
  • protect you from heart disease

 

What is Exercise?

Exercise is any physical activity that improves your fitness and health.

Types of Exercise

Aerobic exercise raises your heart rate and breathing. Examples are brisk walking, swimming, or biking.

Strength exercises target specific muscles to get them stronger (lifting weights, push-ups). Avoid lifting heavy weights if you have high blood pressure.

Exercise Recommendations to Lower Blood Pressure

At least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (example: walking at a brisk pace 5 days per week for 30 minutes)

OR

At least 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (example: fast running 3 days per week for 25 minutes)

It is okay to break your aerobic exercise into 10-15 minute blocks.

Add strength training exercises that target major muscles 2-3 days per week.

Exercise for Weight Loss

Even a little weight loss can lower your blood pressure. Exercise with diet changes is the best plan to lose weight.

Tips to Stay On Track

  • Use an activity tracker to see how much you are moving
  • Schedule your exercise into your calendar
  • Know your back-up plan for bad weather, travel, or unexpected events
  • Exercise with a buddy to keep each other on track
  • Join a sports team
  • Vary your activities to keep it interesting and exercise more muscles
  • Motivate yourself with an event (example: charity walk)
  • Stay safe when exercising alone or at night

 

Check out these links to get you started with an exercise plan!

  • American Heart Association’s Getting Started – Tips for Long-term Exercise Success
  • American Heart Association’s Create Your Own Circuit Workout at Home
  • American Heart Association’s From the Couch to the Pavement – A Plan to Get You Moving
  • National Institutes of Health’s Guide to Physical Activity
  • American Diabetes Association’s Starter Walking Plan

 

*Disclaimer: Always consult your physician or healthcare provider before beginning any exercise program or physical activity. If you experience any pain or difficulty with an exercise or activity, stop immediately and consult your doctor. If you have a medical emergency including, but not limited to, weakness, unsteadiness, lightheadedness, dizziness, chest pain, chest pressure, chest discomfort, nausea, vomiting, or unusual shortness of breath, CALL 911 immediately.