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Quality and Safety

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Rural patients with diabetic foot ulcers currently face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death than their urban counterparts, a health disparity identified by Dr. Meghan Brennan’s team and others. Over 70% of Wisconsin residents live in rural areas, making this a particularly important topic to address in our state.

Read more…

Quit Connect Health: Improving Tobacco Quit Line Referrals

To reduce tobacco use, we improved quit line referrals for tobacco users by 20-fold through Quit Connect, a 90-second clinic staff protocol that integrates the electronic health record with the Wisconsin tobacco quit line. This protocol is being implemented in both primary care and specialty care clinics in multiple Wisconsin health systems including Gundersen and UW Health, with a pending grant to implement at Grady Memorial public hospital in Atlanta (83% African American, 40% uninsured).

Read more…

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening

To prevent death from colorectal cancer, we increased colorectal cancer screening in UW Health clinics from 63% to 81% within four years and have maintained screening rates above 80% for the past five years.  This represents an average increase of ~11,000 additional patients screened for colorectal cancer each year at UW Health.

We are currently working to expand our screening program across rural Wisconsin in partnership with the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality. 

Read more…

Matching Complex Patients with Case Management Programs

To find high-risk patients who might benefit from additional health and social services, we have developed and implemented an artificial intelligence system to identify patients in need of enhanced care coordination in partnership with one of our state’s largest health systems (UW Health).  We are currently screening over 120,000 patients in Dane County each month using the system.

In the upcoming year, we will extend this system across the southern half of Wisconsin in partnership with one of the state’s largest health plans, screening an additional 166,000 patients each month.

Read more…

BP Connect: Improving Blood Pressure Follow-Up

High blood pressures are the most prevalent and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with chronic conditions, who are often vulnerable to gaps between specialty and primary care. Increasing preventive services to address hypertension could prevent more early deaths than any other preventive service. To address these issues, the BP Connect staff protocol was created to connect patients with high blood pressure in a specialty visit back to primary care for timely follow-up.

Read more…

The Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Family-centered care has many benefits, including improved clinical outcomes, increased patient and family engagement and satisfaction, and more effective use of health care resources.

In the hospital setting, one way to achieve these benefits is through family-centered rounds (FCR) at the bedside. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends FCRs as part of its policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in patient- and family-centered care.

Despite their benefits, FCRs can be challenging to operationalize at the institutional level. That’s why PROKids has developed a checklist to help implement FCRs effectively and sustainably.

Read more…

Improving Diabetes Self-Management

Management of diabetes lies almost entirely in the hands of those who live with the condition. The Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging and the Health Innovation Program are providing individuals with diabetes the resources they need for effective self-management of their disease.

Read more…

Opioid Prescribing: Balancing the Benefits of Pain Management with the Risks of Opioid Abuse

Opioid misuse and abuse has become a significant public health problem in virtually all areas of the United States, including Wisconsin, where 827 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016– up 35 percent from the previous year. Clinical guidelines for safer use of opioids were initially proposed in 2009, and have since evolved into the CDC’s widely publicized 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing. The uptake of these guidelines has been variable across the U.S. healthcare system.

To assist in the uptake of clinical guidelines, University of Wisconsin researchers implemented a program to coach primary care doctors to follow opioid prescribing guidelines. This work was done through the use of a novel implementation strategy, called systems consultation, which was designed to promote clinical guideline implementation for opioid prescribing in primary care.  

Read more…


Categories
Info

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Management of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence negatively affects quality of life and mental health and is associated with increased risk of nursing home placement. Nine percent of adult women experience episodes of fecal incontinence at least monthly. Even among women with both urinary and fecal incontinence presenting for urogynecologic care, the rate of verbal disclosure of fecal incontinence symptoms remains low.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. provides an overview of the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence for the busy obstetrician–gynecologist, incorporating existing guidance from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Categories
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AQORN Seminars

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

Access, Quality, and Outcomes Research Network (AQORN) presentations are lunch-time seminars that are open to community partners and the University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, and students interested in health services research.

Attendees typically provide the presenter valuable feedback about their work-in-progress, be it a research idea, conference presentation, or manuscript under development.

Students enrolled in the UW Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research can enroll in the AQORN seminar for credit. To receive one hour of seminar credit, students must do the following:

  • Give a presentation about their research at an AQORN meeting
  • Attend 10 AQORN sessions (including their own presentation). If there are not 10 AQORN sessions in a single semester, students should be prepared to attend additional AQORNs outside of the semester in order to complete the credit.
  • Make sure that their attendance is recorded during the session.
  • Participate in the discussions.
  • Complete a guided summary of each of the sessions attended and send them to the ICTR coordinator.

For more details on attending AQORN seminars for credit, see the “Seminar” information in the curriculum for the Certificate in Clinical and Community Outcomes Research, available on the ICTR website.

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Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Influences of health and environmental deprivation on family relationships among children with chronic disease

Families are often the primary source of close, comforting relationships for children and adolescents. Among chronically ill children, families play a critical role in managing aspects of the disease, often on a daily basis.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox used the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Family Relationships measure over time to understand how family relationships are influenced by these three factors—the characteristics of the child and parent, environmental deprivation, and health over time, among children 8–17 years of age with one of three chronic illnesses (asthma, type 1 diabetes [diabetes], and sickle cell disease).

Read the article

Back to Publications list

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Helping Youth & Families with Diabetes Self-Management

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018

Overview

To prevent the long-term complications of diabetes among children, our program tailored diabetes self-management resources offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 Wisconsin children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their families.  In addition, elements of this program were incorporated into diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.  The study’s methods for engaging youth and families has inspired others like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health to make use of similar strategies.   

The Clinical Problem

“It is hard to imagine ever doing another study where I don’t start out with patients and families first.”Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD UW-Madison, Department of Pediatrics

It is estimated that over 165,000 children under age 20 have T1D, and the number of cases has been increasing over time.  

Due to the multi-faceted approach that is typically needed to manage diabetes, it is difficult for children and their families to adhere to their diabetes self-management regimens.  Less than half of youth with diabetes have optimal glycemic control, and approximately 20% have poor glycemic control. 

When youth are unable to achieve glycemic control, serious complications can result that affect the child’s quality and longevity of life, and the family may become both emotionally and financially stressed.  Additionally, youth with sub-optimal glycemic control are more likely to have sub-optimal control as adults.

Our Response

“[My family’s] communication is very open now. A lot of our problem solving skills were reflected on and improved.”Research Participant

T1D-SMART

The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Resources Toolkit (T1D-SMART) is a resource to help clinicians and healthcare organizations improve health outcomes and quality of life for youth with T1D and their families.

The toolkit contains materials to deliver group-based family-centered self-management support by tailoring self-management resources to the needs and preferences of families of youth with T1D.  The groups meet 4 times over 1 year for 75 minutes each.

Included in the toolkit are materials for planning, implementing, and evaluating the delivery of family-centered self-management resources in a group-based format integrated with routine T1D clinic visits.

This toolkit arises from Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families), a multi-site randomized trial that evaluated the effectiveness of these resources.  Project ACE’s intervention was designed to improve both A1c for youth, as well as quality of life for youth and families, by addressing specific challenges that families living with T1D face every day.  For details about the trial, see Fiallo-Scharer et al., 2017.

Results

In the American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics, this approach significantly improved glycemic control among adolescents, a population for whom self-management is challenging to improve.  The program tailored the diabetes self-management help offered to children and their families at two pediatric diabetes centers, meeting the individual needs of over 2,200 children with T1D and their families at UW Health.

Lasting Impact

The improvements in diabetes self-management seen among adolescents at American Family Children’s Hospital are expected to carry forward, improving lifelong glycemic control, and ultimately delaying complications.

Findings from the study have also prompted these clinics to undertake quality improvement efforts to ensure that needed mental health services are accessible for 600 youth with T1D who receive care at American Family Children’s Hospital diabetes clinics.  Further, this work also provided the motivation for diabetes clinics at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to rejuvenate a group-based, family-centered approach to improving glycemic control among youth who are struggling to control their diabetes.

In addition, organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health have used the study’s methods for engaging youth and families in their outreach work.

Resources

Toolkit

References

Contact

  • 05 Dec, 2018